✨ A Gathering Place for Magical Readers and Writers ✨

Tag Archives: red wheel weiser

Lucid Dreaming, Lucid Living, by Norma Burton and Nisha Burton

Lucid Dreaming, Lucid Living: Your Oracle & Guide to Mastering the Dreamscape, by Norma J. Burton & Nisha Burton
Red Wheel, 1590035380, 200 pages, 44 cards, September 2023

If you have ever had the wild experience of knowing you were dreaming within a dream, and then discovered that you had the ability to manipulate the dream world with your thoughts, then you have tapped into the latent power of lucid dreaming. Lucid dreaming is a potent therapeutic practice that can reduce stress, improve memory, and assist in shadow integration, healing trauma, and overcoming addiction. Lucidity also enhances personal empowerment by bringing mindfulness and a greater sense of agency to both dreams and waking reality. The average person has three to seven oneiric visions a night, but 95 percent of these experiences are forgotten upon waking.1 Fortunately, dream recall is a skill that can be strengthened with practice, and the Lucid Dreaming, Lucid Living oracle teaches dreamers how to achieve conscious awareness and navigate their dreamscapes with intention.

Lucid Dreaming, Lucid Living: Your Oracle & Guide to Mastering the Dreamscape is a collaborative project created by Norma and Nisha Burton, a mother and daughter dream team.2 Transpersonal psychologist Norma Burton has over thirty years of experience in her personal practice, and her work is informed by Jungian analysis, applied neuroscience, and comparative world religions, with an emphasis on Buddhism. Norma also apprenticed with Mexican Huichol shamans for twenty years, who gave her permission to incorporate their shadow healing tradition into her practice, and she is well versed in the shamanic traditions of other cultures, such as the Japanese Shugendo mountain shamans, the Brazilian Condoble-Espiritu healers, and the North American Cherokee, Hopi, Iroquois, and Navajo healers. Norma’s daughter, Nisha Burton, is a visual artist, graphic designer, and filmmaker, whose unique artistic vision enlivens the surreal dreamscapes pictured on the cards.3

This beautiful oracle consists of 44 gilded cards and a glossy full-color 200 page companion guidebook. In the guidebook, each card has a “Lucid Dreaming Teaching” and a “Lucid Living Message,” which advises the dreamer on how to integrate the lesson in both dreaming and waking life. 

The cards are divided into three categories, recognizable by their black, white, and starry night sky backgrounds. The black cards, numbered 1 through 22, are for “Lucid Dream Journeys”; the white cards, numbered 23 through 33, are for “State Checks, Stabilizing, and Reality-Shifting”; and the starry night cards, numbered 34-44, represent “Guides and Guardians.” [14-15]

The black cards give guidance for navigating various types of dreamscapes. Three of these cards (Card 6, “Nightmare Rewrite,” Card 12, “False Awakening,” and Card 13, “Sleep Paralysis”) advise on how to overcome frightening dream experiences by using your personal power to flip the script of the dream or transform these scenarios into opportunities for greater lucidity and mobility through out-of-body experiences.

One of my favorite cards is number 7, titled “Portals,” which teaches that “in lucid dreams, mirrors are entryways into other realities.”4 The Lucid Living message says, “Use them in waking reality to focus on what you like about yourself rather than your perceived flaws.”5 This card delighted me because I use black mirror scrying in my shadow work, and after reading about this card in the guidebook, I had a vivid dream in which I continued this practice in my sleep.  

The white cards teach various practices, called “state checks,” which can help one become lucid while dreaming. The guidebook defines a state check as “an action you conduct during the day to ‘check’ what ‘state’ or reality you are in—dreaming, awake, or out-of-body.”6 State checks performed in the dream realm can trigger lucidity. For example, card 27, titled “Solid Structures,” advises you to touch objects that should be solid to see if your hand will pass through them.7 Performing this state check throughout the day can help program your mind to do the same while dreaming, and will also heighten your critical thinking skills in waking reality. 

The starry night cards depict archetypal guardians and guides that you may encounter in the dream realms. They often represent subconscious aspects of yourself seeking integration, such as your “Cosmic Self and Inner Child,” and “Animal Guides” whose spiritual powers may benefit you at this time. 

I was eager to dive headfirst into this deck. For my first reading, I drew Card 16, “The Three Worlds” and Card 9, “The Dream World Home Base.” Both of these cards are black cards for lucid dream journeys, and feature locations in the Dreamtime, reminding me of a star map. 

“The Three Worlds” card depicts the three shamanic realms that dreamers can access. In “The Three Worlds” card:

“The dreamer navigates upward through the three worlds—the Underworld, the Middle World, and the Upper World. She has learned how to differentiate and distinguish between these dimensions and has integrated the powerful lessons held in each one.”8

The keywords associated with this card are: “Moving, State of flux, Re-surfacing of old wounds, Power struggles, Survival needs, Internal metamorphoses.”9

Working with “The Three Worlds” card entails me categorizing my dreams according to which shamanic realm they take place in. For example, I’ve noticed that all of my Underworld dreams take place underground, in some sort of catacomb, tomb, cave, or the basement of a large haunted house. According to the “Lucid Living Message” in the guidebook, Underworld dreams “include the resurfacing of psychological wounds that occurred in your childhood. It may be related to ancestral baggage and the need to heal patterns from your lineage.”10

The night before I drew this card I had a vivid Underworld dream. I dreamed I was speaking with my deceased father in a room with earthen walls, which I realized was his grave when I woke up. We were both crying in the dream, and it felt like we were resolving unfinished business between us. 

Middle World dreams are out-of-body experiences and mirror the earth plane. I began experimenting with astral projection when I was around 12 years old. Even though I had lucidity during these experiences, I had difficulty directing where I went and often lost consciousness and fell deeper into sleep. 

My Upper World dreams often involve spirit flights through space. In these vivid dreams, my astral body rockets through the earth’s atmosphere at the speed of thought, visiting the moon and planets both in this solar system and beyond. The most vivid one involved me floating near the rings of Saturn. I had a frightening sense of weightlessness and being suspended in the black void of space without any kind of tether to ground me and guide me back to earth. After reading the guidebook cover to cover, I was amazed to find a card titled “The Void” that describes this experience. I thought it was unique to me but apparently it is common among dreamers to encounter “The Void.” 

Sometimes these Upper World dreams involve me being on earth, but looking up at the sky to see the planets looming larger than life overhead and being drawn down towards me. I have also seen UFOs phasing in and out of the earth plane, revealing themselves to me by flickering like blue holograms. These dreams are frightening, because the veil thins and I become aware that there are alien forces all around us, cloaked so that most people can’t see them. I get the sense that these mysterious vessels are influencing our reality but I can’t discern how or what their intentions are. 

The second card I drew was “Dream World Home Base.” This card advises me to establish a safe and secure home base to ground myself in the ever-shifting dream realms. The guidebook suggests creating a home base through visualization, and locking the entrance so it is only accessible to me. 

This card reminded me of the astral castle I created in my late teens, and still visit on occasion. My favorite space is a reading room in a huge private library, with multiple floors of oak bookshelves and warm sunlight streaming through stained glass windows. There is a cloistered garden outside with a beautiful snow-white peacock that eats out of my hand. I haven’t visited in a while so I’m going to make some improvements and peruse the shelves. 

“If your home base is on another planet,” the guidebook says, “try putting a fingerprint or eye-scanning device on the portal to secure it.”11

The thought had never occurred to me to create my own dream planet as a home base, and I love the idea. Perhaps these cards are telling me that I already have a home base on another world that I may soon discover in my dreams.

I learned so much about dreaming from this comprehensive guidebook. It turns out that many experiences I thought were strange or unique to me are actually common dream experiences that are explored in one of the cards. While I haven’t had a fully lucid dream recently, using this deck has improved my dream recall and motivated me to be more consistent in journaling about my dreams. 

I have noticed that I often achieve a certain degree of lucidity in dreams, even if only for a brief moment of awareness that I am dreaming. For example, if my conscious mind is resistant to what is happening in the dream, I will remind myself to allow the dream’s narrative to unfold organically and witness it, so I can see what message it has for me. I have found that trying too hard to control and shape the dream takes too much psychic energy and exhausts me out of lucidity. I also like the surprises that come through the natural progression of dream sequences. For me, the most important benefit of lucidity is dream recall. I would rather observe the dream with mindful awareness and wake up to write it down rather than try to exert control over what happens and risk losing lucidity. 

The Lucid Dreaming, Lucid Living oracle is a phenomenal tool for mindful dreaming, astral projection, and deepening self-knowledge through shadow work. Both beginning and seasoned lucid dreamers will be inspired by this visually stunning deck and insightful guidebook, which teaches us the value of being present, as we lead double lives in our waking and dreaming realities. 

Are you awake right now? Or are you dreaming?

The Beloved Dead, by Carrie Paris and Tina Hardt

The Beloved Dead: An Oracle for Divining Ancient Wisdom, by Carrie Paris and Tina Hardt
Weiser Books, 9781578638109, 82 cards, 144 pages, September 2023

After following Carrie Paris for several years and buying a few of her decks, I was excited about getting my hands on The Beloved Dead: An Oracle for Diving Ancient Wisdom.

The beautiful cards are edged in gold and feature old photographs with artful collage treatments. Each card tells a story and connects the reader to guidance from friends or loved ones in spirit. The cards include a Spirit Throne card, which allows you to invite a friend or loved one in spirit to join you for the reading, ten Acts of Love cards, which contain messages and instructions, and 71 Beloved Dead cards, representing “our esteemed family of radiant souls.”1

Carrie Paris has a master’s degree in the Cultural Study of Cosmology and Divination from the University of Kent, UK. She has created four Lenormand decks, as well as three versions of the Magpie Oracle, which includes charms used for divination. Paris has also created the Relative Tarot. She and her husband divide their time between California and Italy.

Tina Hardt considers herself a cartomancer, charm caster, and Spiritualist.  She is also a creator of several tarot and oracle decks. She was introduced to the world of reading cards in her grandmother’s parlor by her grandmother, an aunt, and two cousins. Hardt lives in Ontario, Canada.

The first day I opened this deck, I posed a question about how best to capitalize on the energy of Mars moving into Scorpio.  I utilized the “General Three-Card Spread,” which spoke to the 1) Main Idea, 2) Heart of the matter, and 3) Outcome or Advice.2

The cards I drew included Personality, Perfection, and Backstory. For Personality, the guidebook shared that “your soul has the blueprint for your best self, the brightest and most authentic expression of this gift of life.”3 From this wisdom, I felt the nudge to go for it! To do ME! I also felt that this is no time to shrink back or refuse to shine!

When I read the guidance from Perfection, I learned that it is time to stop being so hard on myself and stop TRYING to be perfect.  This message confirmed what I learned from the first card. For the third card, Backstory, the card shared this message: 

“The Beloved Dead of Backstory is helping you rewrite inherited scripts. Red pencil out any stale and limiting storylines so that you can make better free-will choices. This card acknowledges that you’re on a journey of self-realization, healing and happiness.”4

The wisdom of these three cards combined to give me this overall guidance: When I “go for it” in my own imperfect way, I write my own story and enjoy healing and happiness. 

Next, I asked a client of mine to allow me to do an Evidential Spread reading for her, which opens the opportunity for spirit communication.  This spread is also a three-card reading and features the following keywords for each card:

1) Who (this can also describe an event or incident)
2) Validation
3) Message

My client, who I’ll call KT, asked this question:  “Who will step forward to support me in my coaching practice?” I placed the special Spirit Throne card in front of me and shuffled the cards.

The following cards were dealt: Hospitality, Home and Prophecy. When KT saw the first card, Hospitality, which featured a man with a nice smile serving drinks, she immediately said, “That’s my Aunt Lydia!  She was a nurse and a doctor’s wife, and they had lots of parties and always entertained lots of people.”

She went on to share that her aunt struggled with an immune-deficiency condition late in life.  The wisdom from this card suggested taking better care of oneself and warned of the dangers of over-giving.  KT understood perfectly that she often gives 110% to clients and fails to get enough rest or take time to eat nutritious foods.

The second card, Home, was a great validation of the message from KT’s aunt, as she loved to visit her aunt’s home when she was a child. Her aunt’s home had a cozy, welcoming vibe and KT realized that she needed to clear some clutter and make some changes to her own home. 

Finally, with the third card, Prophecy, KT’s aunt shared with me that she also “dabbled in cards.”  When I related this to KT, she was not surprised.  She said that she noticed crystals and an Ouija board in her aunt’s house.  Her aunt also shared that she was available to talk with KT anytime in the future.

These three cards joined together to provide this guidance: Take good care of your personal energy, clear clutter, and enjoy your cozy home, so you can shine and better support your clients!

KT loved the wisdom I shared and the reminder to call on her ancestors for support.

I love that these cards can be used for simple readings and basic spirit communication, as well as more layered readings for insight into your personal journey.  The Beloved Dead Spread features 12 cards that can “reveal key information about your upbringing and allow you to discover the parallels that exist between your past and present that may still be influencing your future, whether for good or for bad.”5

Another 12-card spread, The Pillar of Personal Power Spread, can “provide you with a model and blueprint for self-actualization or soul level realignment.”6

The cards are printed in sepia tones with sky blue or aqua backgrounds.  Many of the people in the images sport wings. It’s a really fun deck, yet it also has very serious undertones. The imagery works on many different levels and each reading is informed by the reader’s personal interaction with the graphics. The card stock is a nice weight, and the cards are easy to shuffle. The kit comes in a beautiful box with a magnetic clasp and an indention that easily holds the cards. The box includes a ribbon for pulling out the cards and has ample space for the guidebook.

The Beloved Dead works as a portal into the unconscious.  Each of the elements on the cards speak to individuals in very personal ways.  I loved focusing on the images and making my own notes and then turning to the guidebook for further wisdom.  This deck is not one for doing a quick reading, as it asks you to really sit with the cards and allow the messages to come through in a timely manner. This deck would be best for someone with experience reading cards, and if the person also has experience in mediumship, this would be helpful. 

I’m looking forward to using this deck to speak to my ancestors and also offer readings to clients when wisdom from friends and loved ones on the other side might bring a new perspective to life’s many challenges.

The Rosebud Tarot, by Diana Rose Harper

The Rosebud Tarot: An Archetypal Dreamscape, by Diana Rose Harper and illustrated by Amanda Lee Stilwell
Red Wheel Weiser, 978578638093, 78 cards, 96 pages, June 2023

In The Rosebud Tarot, Diana Rose Harper and Amanda Lee Stilwell have created a beautiful deck of cards that captures a new way to look at Rider-Waite-Smith symbology.. In their own words it is “an archetypal dreamscape.”1

Victorian, Jane Austen, pastoral, and other similar words come to mind when one first flips through the cards. But then, there is a jarring reference to an African queen or the man on the moon. The symbology takes many, many turns – each one more interesting than the last. Pop culture, movie references, and geographic points also play roles in the deck.

Diana Rose Harper is a tarot reader, astrologer, energy worker, writer, and mentor. She considers herself a diviner who is “deeply immersed in the symbolic languages of myth and poetry.”2 She lives in Southern California. Harper’s website is: https://ddamascenaa.com/

Amanda Lee Stilwell is an artist and witch who practices various types of magic. Her art is a combination of digital collage elements and includes graphics from pop culture, vintage imagery, and ritual altar spaces. She currently lives in Chicago. Learn more about Stilwell at: https://amanda-lee-stilwell.tumblr.com/

Harper begins the guidebook with a brief tarot history and structure of a typical deck before how the suits in this deck differ from the traditional Rider-Waite-Smith deck. She discusses a bit about the elements of the suits and then dive into the Major Arcana. She also shares beautiful poetry inside the stories woven for each of the Major Arcana Cards.

The deck is a nice size and easy to shuffle with small hands. The card stock is a nice weight and will hold up well to repeated use. I love the matte finish, which complements the vintage look. The color palette is subdued overall, with tiny pops of bright colors on selected cards. The cards have borders, with a large bottom border that holds the name of each card.

Harper and Stillwell have chosen to use unusual symbols for the standard swords, cups, wands, and pentacles of the Minor Arcana:

Air: Swords = Shears
Water: Cups = Watering Can
Fire: Wands = Staff
Earth: Pentacles = Pots

The court cards also utilize unusual monikers:

Page = Curiosity
Knight = Velocity
Queen = Generosity
King = Sovereignty

This note helps the reader with the court cards:

“We highly encourage you to uncouple mainstream gender from your tarot practice as much as you can, is it will greatly enhance and improve your interpretations!”3

I love the way that the full color guidebook is arranged. Each Major is displayed on a double page spread in the front of the book. Near the back, the pip cards are grouped together by number on a double page spread. All of the 2’s (water, fire, air and earth) are shown on two pages and so on. The court cards are similarly grouped at the very back of the book. This style makes navigation easy and effortless.

I dove into the allure of The Rosebud Tarot and did my favorite Mind-Body-Spirit spread with the deck.  My question was simply: What do I need to know for today?

I drew 2 of Fire, Generosity of Earth (Queen), and 10 of Earth.  From these cards, I divined that I was armed with guidance to light my way, fortified with love and strength in family and a “gleeful legacy.”  In fact, the 10 of Earth was my favorite card in that spread and the creators had this to say: 

“Incarnational delights create a gleeful legacy, the joy of being shared across both time and space.”4 

The cards are playful and yet pack a punch!  I enjoyed the guidebook messages so very much, yet I also got lost in the imagery and allowed myself to welcome my own intuitive hits. Harper includes a spread called The Rosebud Blooms, which features eight cards in a design that looks like a rose. It can work as eight cards, or you can use it simply as a three-card spread.  I chose the three-card option for one friend who asked about the upcoming Aries Full Moon.

The three card spread features:

1. Sweetness at the center:  the very heart of the matter
2. Stem: the structure holding things up
3. Root: an important underlying factor 

For my friend, I drew the Tower, Hang-up (their version of Hanged Man), and 8 of Fire.  From these cards, I learned that although the current chaos my friend is going through is rocking her world, she can stay present and go within to get a new perspective. Finally, she focuses on consistent movement that feels right in her heart. This is the affirmation I created for her:

“My life magically rearranges itself when I am present and open my heart to a new view, honor my desires and go forward.”

She wrote to thank me for the reading and shared that she is currently considering moving ahead with taking new coursework and adding to her work as a yoga teacher. 

This deck would be good for an intermediate reader or seasoned tarot reader.  I feel that it might be too challenging for a new reader who does not have a good grasp on the names of the pip cards or court cards. Anyone who has worked with Rider-Waite-Smith symbols would enjoy this deck and the fun graphics and rich poetry and prose of the guidebook. 

I really enjoyed working with The Rosebud Tarot. I liked learning new symbols for the pip cards and court cards and feel that this new information adds to my knowledge base and divining skills. I can see myself using this deck for client readings. 

The Cards You’re Dealt, by Theresa Reed

The Cards You’re Dealt: How to Deal When Life Gets Real, by Theresa Reed
Red Wheel Weiser, 9781578638031, 240 pages, October 2023

After following Theresa Reed, AKA “The Tarot Lady” for a number of years, I was thrilled to see The Cards You’re Dealt! The title was intriguing and her reputation as both reader and teacher is stellar.  This book did not disappoint. From the first page of her preface on “The Death Cards,” I was drawn in, knowing that along with knowledge I would receive keys to healing as well. Reed’s introduction sets the tone and lights the way for the book, explaining how to use the book, what it covers, and tips to make the most of it.

Reed has over thirty years’ experience reading tarot for clients and is widely known as an expert, speaker, and teacher in tarot.  She is host of an online podcast on tarot called Tarot Bytes, as well as Astrology Bytes which features short pieces on astrology.  She has written four other books, as well as co-authored a book with Shaheen Miro. (One of my favorite books by Reed is her book Astrology for Real Life.) Her website is https://www.thetarotlady.com/, and she currently resides in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

This book interested me because of the wide range of questions I get from clients regarding their lives. When I skimmed the table of contents, I knew that Reed was sharing great information for handling the sensitive subjects of life. Reed shares:

“As I said before, the topic is heavy, but this book is full of hope…. This book is balm for the soul when you’re overwhelmed and need to find solace, healing, and compassion for yourself or others.”1

The book is structured in an easy-to-navigate style with a complete table of contents that takes you through the basics of tarot to the Major and Minor Arcana and on to a wide array of tarot spreads.  In the section on tarot basics, Reed covers a brief history, how to buy your first deck, what’s inside a deck, myths and misconceptions, and how to do a reading. I particularly love her sections called “Words to the Wise” and “Some Tarot Do’s and Don’ts”. Here’s one of my favorites:

“Do not worry about being wrong or right. This desire will create rigidity or trepidation in your readings. There will always be times when you see clearly and other times when the messages are murky. Do your best.”2

Many people who want a tarot reading struggle with asking the “right” question.  Reed has several ideas, including ways to reframe a question to allow the divination tool to share more helpful guidance. 

Next, Reed shares information and interpretations for the Major Arcana followed by the Minor Arcana cards.  She uses the Rider-Waite-Smith cards for her guide and references the traditional symbolism for each card. Although she references her more than thirty years reading with the cards, she asks everyone to trust their own wisdom when interpreting the cards. Early in the book, she references that it is personal preference whether you read reversals or not. Yet, she includes reversed meanings for each card, as well as a journaling prompt and a practice prompt, which asks for a comparison of the card message to personal experience.

She also gives what she calls a “Pro Tip” for each Major Arcana card and the King cards in the Minor Arcana. This tip takes the overall message from that card and creates a suggestion for the reader to use to improve reading skill, intuition and overall divination abilities.  Here’s an example of the Pro Tip from the Chariot:

“The only way to get good at Tarot is constant practice period, not just reading your own daily card, but also reading for as many folks as you can. The more people you read for, the more likely you’ll encounter various situations that will stretch your intuitive muscles and tarot interpretations!3

For the Minor Arcana, Reed does a complete review of the four suits, the court cards, and the numbers (from Ace to 10). She also includes a practice exercise and a pro tip in this section, which precedes the individual card meanings.

Then, in Part Two, Reed adds seven different sections on various life topics, including extensive information on losses. Here, it gets really interesting, as Reed takes you through various spreads for guidance. My favorite spread was the Recovery Spread. Reed shares how to use just three cards to provide guidance for someone who may be recovering from surgery, illness or chemotherapy.  Here is the simple layout from page 116:

Card 1: Present moment
Card 2: What do I need right now?
Card 3: How can I continue to support my healing?

She gives an example from her client files and the reader can easily see how the spread works for this issue. 

I decided to try it myself, as I was recovering from a brief illness.  The cards I drew were: 

1. The Tower: Yes, there’s some chaos and upheaval
2. King of Pentacles: A need to balance a time to rest with anything that needs to be done right now. Use your good judgment to plan the next few days, so you can rest.
3. Knight of Wands: Focus your energy where it is really needed and don’t waste it on burning out!

Sage advice for me, as a person who is always moving!

I also enjoyed her spread on Meeting My Guardian Angel and the section “Creating Spreads Through Conversation”.  Rarely do all readings fit a prescribed tarot spread. Here, Reed gives a way to talk with the person and create questions for the cards in the moment. In this instance, the information relates most to those who are in the last stages of life. The way in which Reed discusses death and dying and working with this type of client is very reverent and compassionate.  The information is invaluable to readers. The information she shares on grief is also presented in a kind, helpful manner.

Reed writes in a very conversational style, almost as if you are receiving a reading from her. The book is very easy to navigate, and includes resources on grief, death and mental health, as well as recommended reading on tarot, grief, dying, Buddhism, and yoga at the back of the book. 

This book would be a great reference book for someone with a few years’ experience reading tarot, as well as seasoned professionals.  With Reed’s guide and earnest practice, even a new reader could really improve their skills with the tips, card meanings and spreads in this resource.

Taking a prominent place in my office, Reed’s book will help me with readings for life’s hard questions and provide guidance for situations that challenge people. Along with the cherished decks I use for client readings, Reed will whisper encouragement to me as a reader, as I do my important work. 

As she says on the title page, Reed shares that The Cards You’re Dealt is:

“A tarot guide that’s not about predicting the future but about dealing with and healing from the tough stuff we all face everyday: loss, illness, challenging relationships.”4

Protection & Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller

Protection & Reversal Magick (Revised and Updated Version): A Witch’s Defense Manual, by Jason Miller
Weiser Books, 978-1578637997, 224 pages, March 2023

“I wrote this book to give you better protections and protocols, not to sow fear and paranoia. May the knowledge in the book aid you in staying safe on your journey, but also remind you that there is no such thing as being completely safe.”1

Protection & Reversal Magick (Revised and Updated Version): A Witch’s Defense Manual by Jason Miller is the newly revised version of what has become a classic book regarding magickal work to protect and ward. This edition features a new introduction by the author and updates to the chapters.

I greatly appreciated the titling of “ New Edition Commentary” at the end of each of the chapters. This provided a user-friendly tool for those who have read the original version, so they could read this version without having to pore through the material trying to identify what has been added.

Additionally, the Introduction to the New Edition, lays the groundwork for the “why” of updating the very successful tome written in 2006. 

“We are no longer live in a purely traditional culture. Modern modes of communication and travel have made the world much smaller than it was. The chance that a Santero or Peruvian shaman will cross paths with a Jewish Kabbalist or British witch is now a very real possibility … Without going out of my way to seek anyone out specifically, I was exposed to a Rosicrucian teacher, a rootworker, a Santera, a Buddhist ngakpa, and several different Wiccans all within central New Jersey, and all before I was twenty years old.”2

Overall, the general focus of the book is one of approaching magick from a practical perspective, just as you would with your mundane endeavors and taking the necessary precautions to ensure that you are safe and out of harm’s way to the best of your abilities.  Much of what Miller addressed in the original version is still true and of solid recommendation today, but the complexity of our society and interactions requires particular attention and nuances to address the ever-growing needs exponentially growing from fear, anger and stress. 

Protection & Reversal Magick is thoughtfully divided into nine chapters that take the reader through the basics of awareness and identification of a magickal, psychic or spiritual personal attack of magick, and the daily practices that support and protect your work. And, because of the extensive work that Miller does with Hekate, the reader will find the book filled with spells, rituals, and other workings aligned with the goddess in Her many guises and those spirits and beings who serve her. 

“Chapter 3: Personal Protection” provides the reader with a selection of protective tools, spells, and rituals, including discussion of shielding, amulets and talismans, invisibility, and cleansing and protection baths. The updated commentary of this section is one of caution that if you are already under attack, protection spells alone will not suffice and that a method of cleansing and purification are required as well.

As the reader moves through subsequent chapters, much of the information and workings gather more depth and require a more nuanced approach. In this way, Protection & Reversal Magick becomes not only a tool of effective magick for protection, but also a wonderful teaching guide of exposure to some facets of magick that not all practitioners are aware of such as exorcisms (as they relate from a non-catholic perspective), servitors, and complex talismanic magick. The information given is reflective of Miller’s diverse magickal background and, as such, offers new areas of exploration for some and a deepening of what is known for others.

Just as there was very little to be improved upon from the content of the first publication, there is very little commentary to be made about the expansion of material. The new commentary is rich with Miller having the perspective of additional years of fine tuning and trial and error. Protection & Reversal Magick  is one of those staple texts that should grace the library of anyone who practices magick. If you want to find out more about Miller, his books and online offerings can be found at StrategicSorcery.net.

Untamed Spirit Animal Oracle, by Francesca Matteoni

Untamed Spirit: Animal Oracle, by Francesca Matteoni and illustrated by Rocco Lombardi
Red Wheel, 978-1590035313, 112 pages, 50 Cards, August 2022

“This oracle of sacred animals is intended principally as an invitation to carefully explore and observe the fellow inhabitants of this planet: the beings that run, slither, jump, fly and swim around us and with us. It is an invitation to explore your own untamed spirit, the wisdom from the wild within.”1

Untamed Spirit: Animal Oracle, by Francesca Matteoni (author) and Rocco Lombardi (illustrator), is a visually stunning deck that may be used for its intended oracular purposes as well as a contemplative tool of alignment with the creatures of the natural world. The size of both deck and book of interpretation makes it an easy travel companion on those explorations into the forests, oceans, mountains, and caves that the animals and we call home.

This oracle deck features a 50-card deck and 122-page guidebook, neatly packaged in a drawer-like printed box.  The deck, box, and booklet are hand drawn images that are hues of black, gray and whites. I like this approach as it provides the reader with clean imagery that is neither distracting nor over laden with bursts of color or symbology that is unnecessary.

The dynamic guidebook describes the origin of each animal’s sacred nature along with a chart that lists its element, where it lives, zoological information,  an affirmation of mystical/spiritual energy of calling, symbols associated with it, and a brief charm to ask the animal for advice or guidance. Then each of the 50 cards features a message specific to the animal represented, and the back of each oracle card is adorned with a black and white peacock feather. 

The information relating to each of the oracle cards is thoughtfully organized by the element naturally associated with the animal (Earth, Air, Water and Fire) rather than alphabetically. Some readers may find this a bit clumsy, however, I had a sense that it was purposeful in adding another layer of thought and identification for the reader. This table of contents neatly spans two pages and the entire number of animals represented within the deck fits easily, providing the reader an “at a glance” view to find their card(s). 

I immediately went to the card and interpretation regarding the Swan, my favorite guide from early days of being a professional ballerina and my admiration of Anna Pavlova:

“The swan hour strikes when worlds touch.  I lift myself up from the water into the frigid air.  I carry with me the divine spark that is in every living being and return it to the sky.  The swan hour is the hour in which the soul emerges. Everything is pure.”2

I have come across many different interpretations of the swan, but this interpretation added another layer of depth to the majesty and intention of swan’s energy; that of the fires of the divine shining from within. Matteoni presents a description of grace as well as the recognition of the awkwardness of the cygnet, whose visage and movements do not give rise to this fledgling’s transformation into an ethereal creature. The image of the Swan crafted by Lombardi is both beautiful and evocative of the duality of form of this creature, being neither in the light and not of the dark but moving through a space that is the compilation of both.

My second card was drawn randomly, after asking “What is my focus in the present time?”. Not surprisingly, my subconscious immediately sought out the Bee:

“I am the alchemist of the word.  I transform the nectar of flowers into fruit. In my home, I produce golden honey. My buzzing is the sound of all that is regenerated. I dedicate my work to the great universal mother. I am responsible for what I create.”3

As I read the interpretation, I am reminded that the Bee is part of a collaborative matriarchal society that carries great responsibility within the animal world. Though small, it is mighty in what it can produce and create that is both nourishment and healing. The key words Matteoni uses for the Bee on the card are “responsibility” and “dedication”. This card spoke to me at a personal level of my work within the community as an Elder and High Priestess of the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel Tradition, as mother of five, wife of 46+ years and my responsibilities as an Admin. Assistant within a diverse school district. Busy bee indeed!

Overall, Untamed Spirit: Animal Oracle is a refreshing offering that stands apart from the colorful and graphic laden decks that are in abundance. The simplicity of interpretations provided and the depth of the black and white imagery make this oracle deck a perfect choice for those less familiar with using an oracle system, creating a user-friendly format to explore the mystical aspects of organic life. This is a deck that will be returned to frequently by novice and expert alike. With each new exploration, it will catalyze within its user a call to the stream of animal spirit that resides within all sentient life on our planet.

Gemstone and Crystal Magic, by Gerina Dunwich

Gemstone and Crystal Magic: A Modern Witch’s Guide to Using Stones for Spells, Amulets, Rituals, and Divination, by Gerina Dunwich
Weiser Books, 1637480075, 256 pages, August 2022

After reading a book on lithomancy recently, I thought it would do me good to brush up on my knowledge of gemstones and crystals. It seemed opportune that I had Gemstone and Crystal Magic: A Modern Witch’s Guide to Using Stones for Spells, Amulets, Rituals, and Divination by Gerina Dunwich sitting on my shelf just when I needed it! Delving into this book has give me tons of insight into the magical properties of gem and crystals, much more than I initially anticipated, to help me discover all the ways I can use the potency of them in my practice. Combining history with personal experience, Dunwich has brought to light all various forms of magical workings one can use gemstones and crystals for, presenting a full-picture of their potential.

What stood out to me the most at first was how this book went well beyond the far too common “New Age” descriptions of  crystals and gemstones. Once I started to learn more about Dunwich’s background, the way crystals and gemstones are approached made a lot of sense – she is an astrologer and occult historian! And to me this really makes this book on the topic standout from the rest because there’s so much information woven in from ancient texts and grimoires that situate the discussion in a more historical context, amplifying the timehold traditions and beliefs about different crystals and gemstones.

Dunwich is also a dedicated paranormal researcher, who is clearly very comfortable with the idea of spirits, demons, and curses, which are some topics not shied away from in the book. For instance, she goes into detail about the tragedies surrounding the allegedly cursed Hope Diamond and the paranormal phenomena of lithoboly. This valuable information contained in Gemstone and Crystal Magic that is often overlooked in other books that only superficially cover the topic. For experienced magical practitioners, this book can take your crystal and gemstone to the next level by teaching how to reverse curses, neutralize harmful energy, and use protection magic in combination with healing, spellwork, and manifestation.

Throughout the book many sources are referenced, which gives the reader plenty of avenues to explore if they are inspired. While Dunwich’s personal experience has certainly provided her with knowledge to write this book, the objectiveness in her writing is what really stands out. This isn’t a “how-to” based on Dunwich’s personal practice, but rather a compendium of knowledge she’s collected through research and study. This is a book that is filled with lore, history, anecdotes of magical practitioners, and well-sourced information about the use of crystals and gemstones.

My favorite chapter was “Stones of Zodiac” which had very interesting tables of correspondences that certainly would be useful in magical workings. There was a table of the gemstones associated with the guardian angels associated with each sign, the twelve apostles, animals of the Chinese zodiac, hour of birth, and monthly birthstones according to different traditions (Modern, Traditional, Mystical, Ayurvedic, Hebrew, Arabic, and Roman). Even if you’re not very familiar with astrology, this section could help to connect to your planetary energies through the gemstones.

I was also especially impressed by the six appendices at the end of the book, which includes tables of pagan gods and goddesses and their gemstones, gemstones for the eight sabbats, and gemstones for the parts of the Tree of Life, along with a calendar of daily stones for the entire year and different gemstone correspondences. It is arranged for the reader to easily be able to identify which gemstone they might want to work with depending on the day, time of year, or the deity they are inviting into their practice.

Aside from the resourceful tables of Gemstone and Crystal Magic, Dunwich also features guidance for making one’s own wand or talismans, tons of spells for all sorts of things from dream work to invisibility to love and money, picking a gemstone as an amulet, creating lunar tonic and other elixirs, and cleansing your stones. And this is only a small sampling of everything featured in this book!

One thing I will point out though is this book seems geared towards those with an existing foundation of magical experience. Yet while it’s not “hand-holding”,  I wouldn’t shy away from reading it either if you’re a beginner interested in learning how to deepen your magical working through the use of gemstones. Just keep in mind it focuses on the actual magical aspects of gemstones rather than how they can be used for energy enhancement or visual appeal in one’s craft, which is to say it goes deep into the heart of magic, bypassing the more superficial aspects working with gemstones many books focus on now-a-days.

Overall, Gemstone and Crystal Magic is a wonderful go-to reference book for those who are looking to incorporate gemstones into their magical practice. There are so many reasons to connect with gemstones and a variety of ways to do so, all based on what your magical work is calling for at the moment. This book is brimming with magical potency! You can feel the history and folklore is well-bound within these pages wanting to be passed forward and kept alive, which Dunwich has certainly done through her thorough compilation of gemstone knowledge!

The Creative Pendulum, by Joan Rose Staffen

The Creative Pendulum: Keys to Unlock Your Innovative Spirit, by Joan Rose Staffen
Red Wheel Weiser, 9781578637515, 288 pages, June 2022

The Creative Pendulum: Keys to Unlock Your Innovative Spirit by Joan Rose Staffen got me out of a creative rut in the most fun way. It had been a while since I’d used my pendulum, but after a quick dust-off, I remembered how much insight I used to get from this method of divination. It seems I had forgotten the myriad of possibilities that came from tuning into my higher consciousness in order to figure out what was needed in my life.

Until reading this book though, I had never thought to practically weave together my creativity and work life by dowsing with my pendulum. But Staffen provided me with a marvelous gift of ingenuity in this book that inspired a renewed interest in the pendulum as a divination tool while also relighting my spiritual spark.

I will say right off the bat what I liked most about this book is Staffen’s openness, humor, and willingness to think outside the box that pours through every page. This pendulum technique is so unique and quickly ignites new insights. And I feel this technique works because Staffen has pulled from her life experience to create a method that is practical, creative, and spiritual all in one.

Anecdote after anecdote showcases how Staffen deepned her creative practice and expanded her wisdom through trusting the process. For instance, how she once “spent a year asking God/Goddess for my right, perfect place, opportunity, and company”1 before launching her business venture. Reading her stories is not only amusing, but also reaffirms that we always have the opportunity to try new things, learn, and grow; this has helped her navigate through plenty of career changes and shifts in life circumstances. Through the ups and downs in life, Staffen reminds us that the Muse is always present – all we need to do is tune into the energy at hand.

But even though this book is wonderfully infused with Staffen’s spirit, the focus remains centered on readers expanding their life, overcoming roadblocks, and connecting with their own creativity. Staffen has created Intuitive Creativity Charts that the reader can use their pendulum to gain a deeper understanding of what is being called for in their life right now. The technique she teaches in this book involves dowsing with the pendulum over the Intuitive Creativity Charts for guidance that goes beyond simply “yes/no” answers, the more simple and commonly used method of working with a pendulum.

For those of you who might not know how pendulums work through the process of dowsing, Staffen provides a great description:

“Dowsing has both scientific and mystical elements that help us tap into both our subconscious and super-conscious minds. Using the pendulum can help us to center emotionally and spiritually, and we can more easily open to a meditative state, where we become calm, relaxed, and receptive to the suggestions presented by the pendulum and charts.”2

Chapter two, “Learn to Dowse with the Pendulum,” provides all the information needed to get started, even if you’re completely new to this method of divination. Staffen provides details such as where and when to use one’s pendulum, how to center yourself for accurate results, and what to do if your dowsing isn’t working. She also shares with readers step-by-step instructions for how to dowse, which is very easy to follow along with. As with anything, practice is important, so even if at first you’re a bit skeptical or unsure, I recommend keep going!

Now, while the main premise of the book is teaching readers how to use the Intuitive Creativity Charts, it includes a heap of creative life-coaching. Staffen goes chapter by chapter explaining the significance of each chart, illuminating how it can be used for insight, as well as explaining all of the potential chart pendulum answers to clarify the messages that might come through. But these aren’t static explanations, such as “If your pendulum lands on this then it means xyz..” Rather, it’s almost like Staffen is coaching you through understanding the answers revealed. 

Oftentimes there are exercises to do, like meditations and journal prompts, to ground the insight and find out what it means for you personally. And it’s this delivery from Staffen, focused on process more than result, that makes the book so creatively stimulating. Dowsing with the Intuitive Creative Charts is not meant to be a one-size fits all approach! And I was amazed at all the guidance available using the charts. Staffen has done a great job of charting questions you might not even have ever thought to ask.

There’s a chart for answering questions about one’s creative process (“What literary/performing/visual art should I pursue?” and “What artistic needs do I have?”), timing (“When’s the best time to take action?”), energy work (“How can I clear my chakras?” and “How can I overcome negative beliefs?”), business strategy (“How can I market my art?” and “What is the best income stream for me?”), plus so much more! I honestly have spent hours trying out different charts and am always so surprised by the accuracy of the pendulum responses.

And this guidance is tailored to recognize a multitude of paths, rather than a prescriptive “it has to be this way to work” model, that opens new doorways, especially when one starts to layer and sift through all the insight they’re getting from the perspective of each chart.

Once you’re comfortable with the technique, I’ve found it’s useful to use charts in combination. For instance, I use my pendulum to dowse for questions related to my creative identity and how to improve my income stream. (I try not to ask too many questions at once, even though I want to!) Quickly, I saw how the answers were interrelated and urging me in a new direction.

One really neat thing about The Creative Pendulum is how Staffen shared two chapters on using the pendulum and Intuitive Creativity Charts to coach yourself and others. She offers tips for coaching oneself with a reading and includes two personal assessments worksheets that help you to clarify the issue you’re working on and hone in solutions.

Then there’s also an entire chapter on coaching others by discovering their talents and motivating them to take action. Staffen offers guidance about preparing for a session with clients, along with client assessment forms that can be used when working with them. I so deeply respect Staffen’s choice to so transparently share her Intuitive Creativity Charts method with others and teach them how they can use it to coach others. 

And it gets better – Staffen saved some of the best material for last, such as the chapter “Paint on Your Hands: Art Prompts” that are “fun exercises…to help beginners spark their own brave, intuitive creative within.”3 As a creative at heart that often needs a nudge to indulge, I loved the prompts to draw, create collages, play with finger paints, and more! It got me motivated to actually take out my art supplies and enjoy/explore myself.

In the final chapter, Staffen suggests starting a “creativity cluster” of “like-minded people who want to learn to dowse, journal, and play together!”4 Now I’m certainly wanting to do this, and I’m thinking about starting a Meet-Up group once I relocate next month. 

Overall, The Creative Pendulum has been such a breath of fresh air! I highly recommend this book for those seeking to expand their horizons. When read with curiosity and an open-mind, the possibilities of what you might discover about yourself through the process of dowsing with Staffen’s Intuitive Creativity Charts are endless.

From discovering your creative identity to figuring out what business steps you should take next, this book is useful on so many levels, which opens doors for readers to make their dreams a reality through the aid of their pendulum. It’s certainly a book one can come back to time and time again, whenever you are feeling called to use the guidance of the charts for both yourself and teaching others.

A Spellbook for the Seasons, by Tudorbeth

A Spellbook for the Seasons: Welcome Natural Change with Magical Blessings, by Tudorbeth
Red Wheel Weiser, 9781590035375, 224 pages, March 2022

It’s always wonderful to step into a new season. How inspiring to embrace the changes in the natural world – differences in the light, the weather, the plants, the holidays. A Spellbook for the Seasons: Welcome Natural Change with Magical Blessing by Tudrobeth is a companion to the seasons that will greatly enhance your experiences and show you in so many ways how we are connected to the natural world.

Tudorbeth invites the reader to embrace the seasons and to “investigate these festivals (that are celebrated), the practical magic that flows through our seasons, and the gods that rule over the different times of the year.”1 I particularly liked that the book opens with two blessings: one for sisters and brothers around the world and one for the seasons and the turning of the wheel of the year.

The book is divided into the four seasons, with focus on each season’s garden, crystals, goddesses and gods, and spells, blessings and rituals. As I read the book in the spring, I focused most of my attention on that season. The spring months are associated with the Celtic deities such as Ostara, Belenus (Beltaine), and Brigid. The spring’s spells, blessings, and rituals include those for encouraging flowering in the garden, a daisy love ritual, and Ostara fresh air spell.

I performed the Ostara ritual on Ostara Eve, as the ritual is meant to embody hope, and then I made Ostara magic salt on the night of the full moon in March. When sprinkled around the home or office, it ensures bright ideas and business success. I now have my jar of pink salt sitting in a glass jar, ready for use! I enjoyed following Tudorbeth’s guidance and felt these small magical acts really attuned me to the energies of the season of spring.

For spring cleaning, there’s a small section on decluttering. I loved the Charm of Manannan. As Tudorbeth explains, the Celtic god, Manannan is a “foster father to the many children he takes under his care, and as a protector god he cares deeply for his children.”2 The Charm of Manannan is meant to bring about a loving and caring family home environment.

Additionally, there are rain blessings and rain energy spells that are meant to be done in a spring rainfall. The section on Beltane traditions provided an overview of Beltane, a cleansing detox ritual, and a spring sage clearing ritual. The Charm of Belenus is meant to be done toward the end of spring. The Charm is meant to invoke a happy, fun, and prosperous environment.

My recommendation for using this book to full advantage is to read the section on the upcoming season prior to the season’s arrival so that you have time to gather the items needed for the spells. While some might need to be collected at the last minute, such as flower-specific items, you can be prepared with other items such as salts, colored candles, essential oils, and shells. And then take your time in the season, experimenting with what you’re drawn to.

The sections on the season-specific garden offered suggestions on bringing wonder and magic into your outdoor space and inviting in the fairies. For spring, they include bluebells, hyacinth, and lily of the valley. As spring is associated with rain and showers, Tudorbeth focused on the power of the rainbow, and the suggested crystals include the colors of spring that form a pentagram of rainbows. The five spring crystals are rainbow opal, rainbow moonstone, rainbow obsidian, rainbow pyrite, and rainbow quartz.

The one downside for me was that some of the items were not readily available where I live such as periwinkle flowers or hawthorn twigs but again, with advance notice (e.g. reading the season in advance) I probably could have searched them out.

The other seasons are also given justice. Summer focuses on love, featuring Aphrodite and Apollo, a spell to welcome nymphs into the garden, Midsummer salt, a Lammas gratitude ritual, and a ritual for Midsummer enchantment. For Autumn, among other things, there is a clarity spell, an equinox healing ritual, a Mabon success spell, a Charm of Minerva (one of the three Roman deities who rule over the Autumn months), and a Samhain remembrance potion. Winter offers a first snow spell, an ice wand consecration ritual (if you are able to get an icicle), a Charm of Odin, midwinter tea, and an Imbolc ritual.

The most amazing part of A Spellbook for the Seasons is all the colorful, informative pictures. This is a gorgeous book to have on a table in your home because of the aesthetics that make it soothing to read through. The beauty of this book naturally entices one to want to perform with all the potent magic within. I really enjoyed the many hand-drawn illustrations, along with how the text on each page was simple and elegant. There is no clutter in the book, making it easy to focus on the spellwork or ritual you’re performing.

Tudorbeth is a hereditary practitioner of the Craft. The rules and gifts of herb lore, scrying, healing, tasseomancy, numerology, and candle magic have been passed down to her through several generations. I especially loved her reminder that we are meant to “use the gift that nature brings with these spells, but in return give something back … We are all connected to one another and everything around us. We are nature.”3 I highly recommend A Spellbook for the Seasons with encouragement to plan ahead to be able to use the knowledge imparted within its pages to full advantage.

Witch, Please, By Victoria Maxwell

Witch, Please: Empowerment and Enlightenment for the Modern Mystic, by Victoria Maxwell
Red Wheel Books, 9781590035320, 200 pages, March 2022

I love a book that opens with a powerful statement. Victoria Maxwell’s beautifully written offering, Witch, Please: Empowerment and Enlightenment for the Modern Mystic, starts by telling the reader that the magic isn’t in the book they are holding: the magic is inside them. This type of tone setting is precisely why this book belongs in everyone’s collection, whether they view themselves as witchy, spiritual, or simply just an interested passerby.

A modern mystic and spiritual teacher, Maxwell is devoted to serving her community through her online classes, in person workshops, private sessions, and a variety of social media groups and subscription offerings. Her focus is on helping those she works with reconnect to their own light, their inner guidance, spiritual path and power so they can live out their best and highest lives.

The book is set out cleanly, with two parts as well as an introduction, glossary, acknowledgements and index. There is also a special addition that I wasn’t expecting but makes perfect sense why it was included: “The Next Chapter’” It’s a page and a half long and resonated deeply with me when I read it. Maxwell sums up the spirit of her book in five points that reflect the depth of care she feels for those searching for their place in the spiritual world. It’s a beautiful way of ending the book and imparting a feeling of completion.

The book is divided into two parts. Part One deal with the basics: laying foundations for your practice, tools, actual practices, aligning with friends in spirit, and making magic. Part Two talks about practical magic: relationships, setting up a home sanctuary, money magic, magic for careers, and living your purpose. The glossary is a high-level collection of terms used throughout the book that some who are venturing down this path for the first time might not be familiar with. For me, it was interesting to see how Maxwell defines terms that are used often within the spiritual realm.

The introduction establishes Maxwell’s early influences as well as her personal journey through spiritualism. Her writing is clean and purposeful, with no excessive verbiage and easy to understand language. That’s not to say that her work is basic: this book is far from that. While certainly geared towards those who are just starting their journey, there is a lot packed into this book. For me, reading similar information isn’t monotonous: it’s interesting for me to see how different people interpret similar themes. I am also curious to understand how others view their own craft and how they personally practice whatever form of magic they subscribe to. 

Maxwell talks at length about protection in the first part of the book, which is something I feel is somewhat overlooked at times. We assume that those reading know how to protect themselves and their energy and Maxwell’s decision to include a lengthy section on various practices is wonderful to read. She understands that some of protection work is shadow work, in that you cannot protect yourself from creating your own negativity if you are not aware you are doing it. She says, “We can’t walk thought life protecting ourselves against others without doing a bit of shadow work and paying attention to what we are putting out there too.”1

She mentions being aware of the type of energy we bring to certain situations and ensuring that we are doing our best to raise those vibrations intentionally and mindfully. She pairs this practice with clearing, which makes damn good sense! She explains the process:

“We can protect ourselves all we like, but we must also clear out the energetic gunk we pick up along the way…If you are full of someone else’s thoughts, emotions, or energy before you start a spell you may end up manifesting things you don’t really want.”2

Sections of the book are printed in a different color and are designated as action items, for want of a better phrase. These sections include prayers, lists of bullet points for consideration, recipes, and so on. I found the different font to be quite useful in helping sort and separate the book visually as I progressed through it. For those who can discern color, the eye immediately tracks to the different font and recognizes it as important, something that I very much appreciated as sometimes I become lazy and let my eyes skim over text without truly absorbing it. 

The blend of shadow work with the various spiritual practices is very much my jam and I am fully appreciative of how Maxwell entwined these two themes seamlessly in this book. Throughout the book, there are references to clearing your energy and examining your relationships to various things like money and career, and all of these things resonate deeply with me. I have found that the best magic I have ever done for myself has always come on the heels of some deep excavation I’ve done in the dark hours of the night. I am happy to see that Maxwell has illuminated this very important aspect of working magic in her book.

Some people might pick up Witch, Please and dismiss it because it’s pink and cute and looks like a beach read. Those people don’t deserve this book in their hands so let them put it down and then make sure they never see it again. Grab a copy for yourself, for your aunt who is always making you teas, your best friend who loves flowers, and the office mate who always seems extremely put together. Each one will get something different out of this book, which is precisely the point. Personally, this is the book that I will pull down off my shelf when I feel a bit off as it’s a beautiful reminder of encouragement to stand in my power.