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2024 Lunar and Seasonal Diary, by Stacey Demarco

2024 Lunar and Seasonal Diary – Northern Hemisphere, by Stacey Demarco
Rockpool Publishing, 978-1925946666, 216 pages, June 2023

I am really looking forward to using my 2024 Lunar and Seasonal Diary – Northern Hemisphere by Stacey Demarco. This diary is beautifully illustrated and the contents on lunar and seasonal energies make it much more than a simple day planner. Each page is an invitation to reflect, plan, and take away some new bit of wisdom that would have otherwise gone unfound. A diary is of no use if it is something more than just a place to count off the days; this diary is so much more than that and then some!

Due diligence has been given by Demarco in creating not only a functional planner but also a source of teachings about lunar workings, correspondences, spell craft, ritual, and introductory astrology. Her writing makes the 2024 Lunar and Seasonal Diary accessible to the aficionados of lunar-forward planning and the witches who wants to incorporate powerful magick in their daily life.

The first 20+ pages are dedicated to the lunar arts and topics include elements and directions, spell timings and moon cycles, lunar energies and crystals, and the wheel of the year. The wheel of the year section is a very robust overview of the sabbats that is packed with readily-applied information on how the month’s energy supported the myriad ways of celebration.

The 2024 Lunar and Seasonal Diary is organized into the standard twelve-month, weekly format common to most planners. Additionally, each month offers a double page section highlighting a specific deity aligned with that month’s energy and an accompanying spell or ritual guiding how to call that energy into the month’s work. Beautiful graphics herald each month and a quick goal starter introduces the weekly pages. For those who are visually stimulated with the tasks of thinking out your goals, what’s and when’s will be happily committed to paper. The paper itself is strong, heavy stock with no bleed through. 

Would I Recommend?

What I omitted in the beginning of this review is that I am highly selective when it comes to my yearly planner. In fact, so much so that it is not unusual for me to have 5-6 different types and formats of these and still not settle on any one just because it doesn’t hit all my checkboxes.

With that being said, 2024 Lunar and Seasonal Diary by Stacey Demarco checks all of the boxes for anyone wanting a beautiful, functional, educational and “just feels right” 2024 diary.  This is a keeper and I am confident that I will be using it for the entirety of the year. 

About the Author Stacey Demarco

Stacey Demarco is The Modern Witch. Passionate about bringing practical magic to everyone and inspiring people to have a deeper connection with nature, she has been teaching witchcraft and mythos for many decades. This diary is now in its 14th edition and is published in both the southern and northern hemispheres. She is the author of The Enchanted Moon and The Priestess Path, which have been translated into other languages. Her oracle card decks include the bestselling Queen of the Moon, Divine Animals, Moon Magick, Elemental Oracle, Oracle of the Universe, and Deep, Dark and Dangerous. An animal activist, ethical beekeeper and dedicated adventure traveler, she lives in Sydney, Australia on a cliff by the beach with her husband and furry companions. Stacey provides private consults as well as teaching workshops, and leads the popular Wild Souls Retreats nationally and internationally.

Oracle of the Universe, by Stacey Demarco

Oracle of the Universe: Divine Guidance From the Cosmos, by Stacey Demarco, illustrated by Kinga Britschgi
Rockpool Publishing, 9781922785015, 112 pages, 44 cards, 2023

The shining box for the Oracle of the Universe: Divine Guidance From the Cosmos really attracts your attention with the background of the night sky, a woman’s profile, and an electrical storm in multiple colors in place of the woman’s brain. By adding an overlay of even more stars, Stacey Demarco and Kinga Britschgi immediately let you know that a journey through the cosmos is about to begin!

Did you know that we have eighty-eight areas of the night sky? Demarco shares this:

“Constellations are named areas of the celestial sphere that are used to divide the night sky into specific regions for easy reference and we now officially have 88.”1

Stacey Demarco is an author, pagan practitioner and modern witch, whose passion is to “make practical magic accessible to everyone and to reconnect people with the power of nature.”2 Demarco has created nine oracle decks, one tarot deck, a lunar calendar and numerous best-selling books. She is a popular teacher and speaker in her native Australia and around the world. 

As an award-winning artist and digital creator, Kinga Britschgi has a degree in fine art and a master’s degree in bilingual education. After working as a teacher, Britschgi transitioned to the digital world, where she has been creating art for more than twenty years. Originally from Hungary, she now lives in the US with her husband and son. 

The collaboration for this deck of oracle cards is truly amazing! From the compelling cover art to the rich jewel-tone colors of the cards, I was mesmerized by the deep night sky combinations. Britschgi adds symbols, animals, people, nature, elements, and mythical creatures in a rich collage with stars, stars and more stars. Each card contains a number and a title that helps you identify it as either Constellation, Nebula, or Bright Star. Then, the creators add the name, a common name (if there is one), and a key word or theme. 

For example, for the card Sirius, it is identified as a “Bright Star,” tagged “Sirius”, modified as “Dog Star” as its more common name, and further marked with “Consistency” as its keyword. This method of identification is very helpful as you navigate the extensive guidebook. The Table of Contents is also broken into the three sections mentioned and each card is listed in number order. In addition to the name of the constellation, nebula, or bright star, they also include the key word in the table of contents.

The Constellations section is the largest grouping and includes the twelve zodiac star formations, as well as many others, such as Andromeda, Centaurus, and Cassiopea. In all, the creators include thirty-two Constellations, eight Nebula and four Bright Stars.

The guidebook is quite extensive and includes an introduction, a section on how to best use the forty-four cards, and several pages on spreads for this deck. Demarco also features a simple ritual for dedicating your deck and a few words on combining this deck with other decks. For each card, the creators feature a small, four-color photo of the card, key word, guidance summary, affirmation and information on the myth or history and IAU official astronomy tag for sky viewing. 

I took the cards on a test flight and utilized a spread called “The Stellar Read.”3 For this spread, I was to pull out the four Bright Star cards and set those aside. Next, I shuffled the rest of the deck and chose three cards. Then, I shuffled the four Bright Star cards and chose one. Here is a recap of the cards I drew and description of the spread placements:

  1. Represents the blind spot or hidden issue:  #7 Libra – Balance
  2. Represents the path of most empowerment: #35 Butterfly – Change
  3. Represents the truth of the matter: #3 Gemini – Rescue
  4. Bright Star Card: Represents the immediate action to take: #43 Vega – Dynamism

My question regarded how to get moving on a large project I was working on, where I felt stalled or sidetracked. From the four cards, I came to realize that I needed more balance, rather than an “all or nothing” work pace. I also was challenged to look at my schedule and see where changes could be made to better accommodate work in the mornings, when I am at my best.

I also got a message about waiting to respond to requests for guidance and help, rather than jumping in and “rescuing” people.  Finally, the Bright Star card spoke to the importance of setting goals, doing the work, and then resting when tired. This is a great reminder!

Next, I pulled cards for friends, both online and in my Friday “Coffee & Cards” group.  For one friend, I pulled the Crux, or Southern Cross, card.  She called to thank me and related that the message of carefully communicating to avoid sending mixed messages was right on track for her. The card featured two aboriginal men and she related that she has always been drawn to the indigenous people of Australia. 

Another friend asked: “What do I need to know as I head into the holiday season?” Her card was #26 Cygnus which talked of compassion. She was guided to show compassion for others and for herself.  I think I saw tears in her eyes when she read this passage from the guidebook:

“Get your self-compassion on and forgive yourself. It’s easy to show compassion to those you know, but a greater compassion is to show it in action to those you don’t. Give someone the benefit of the doubt. Show up.”4

One of my Facebook friends received #28 Draco, which featured a dragon and the theme of “guardianship.”  She wrote to share: “This message really speaks to me today.  I need to remember good boundaries, especially as we enter the holiday season.  Thank you!”

These cards are dynamic, beautiful, and so very healing.  The rich artwork and gilt-edge finish may draw you in, but the guidance is deep and resonates on many levels. I really like the layers of the information in the guidebook. A person can simply select a card and use the keyword as a theme for their day.  Or they can go to the guidebook and read the guidance summary.  If someone has more time and wants to learn about the myth or history of the nighttime star or nebula, the information on each one is extensive. Finally, if a person wants to find the star or nebula in the sky, the information to do so is provided.  

I appreciate the structured layout of the guidebook and the easy navigation. Demarco has created signposts to make retrieving the guidance, the myth, and the sky placement easy and effortless. Oracle of the Universe would be great for a novice oracle card reader, as well as the more experienced diviner.  Also, if someone is interested in stars and nebulas, this would be a great gift! I can see myself adding this deck to client readings for a final bit of guidance.  I also look forward to using this deck for my own daily card reading.

Deep, Dark & Dangerous, by Stacey Demarco

Deep, Dark & Dangerous: The Oracle of the Beautiful Darkness, by Stacey Demarco and illustrated by Kinga Britschgi
Rockpool Publishing, 1922579076, 128 pages, 44 cards, October 2022

Where do you turn to when you want illumination on the darkness present in your life? Oracle cards are my go-to for all sorts of questions, but often for the deeper questions, the “love and light” aspects of many decks feels incomplete, leaving me longing for something more. Deep, Dark & Dangerous: The Oracle of the Beautiful Darkness by Stacey Demarco has become the missing link in my oracle readings, providing meaningful insights from the archetypal energies that lurk in our shadows and depths.

There’s a real potency to this deck. For the first time in a while, I took Demarco’s suggestion of a dedication ritual in the guide book and performed it before getting started. Admittedly, this is something I rarely do with oracle cards, but this deck inspired a certain reverence that made it feel necessary to brace myself and prepare properly. Just like how I dip my toes into a deep pool to test the warmth before diving in, I have been called to move more slowly with this deck as I do my readings – not wanting to pull too many cards at once and be overwhelmed by what energy is coming through the deck.

Luckily, Demarco is someone I trust to guide readers to meeting these mysterious energies with care. She has created dozens of oracle decks and books, including The Enchanted Moon, Plants of Power, Moon Magick, and The Halloween Oracle. For over 25 years she has shared her gifts as a pagan practitioner and modern witch, teaching how spirituality can be used to solve modern day problems. In the guidebook, she writes:

Confession: I’ve even carefully put the small strip of paper holding the new cards together back on after each reading. This might be my subconscious way of trying to “tame” these forces, which is no easy feat, as many spiritual practitioners know.

“If we decide to seek or even engage with these unconscious aspects of ourselves, these darker shadows, these ill-formed, half-created, seemingly ugly monsters of our unconscious, perhaps we can refine them, perhaps even reshape them into something exquisitely useful and beautiful.”1

The cards are divided into three types: dark, deep, and dangerous. The dark cards are filled with entities that reside in the darker places (Kali, Persephone, Anubis, Charon) while the deep cards are entities that reside deep within our psyche, the ocean, or other environments (Hydra, Selkie, Mermaid). My favorite ones are the dangerous cards that feature predatory entities that are often out to harm us, unless we attune our senses to the dangers at hand and heed their warning (Werewolf, Vampire, Medusa, Erinyes).

The guidebook provides a few ideas for spreads to use for the card, such as the Dark Moon Three-Card Draw and The Four Element Spread, along with guidance on how to tune in and pick the cards. Then for each card Demarco shares a paragraph-long oracle message, the dualistic qualities the card represents (ex. clarity/opaqueness or discipline/chaos), the mythos or story of the entity on the card, and finally, the plant and crystal companion. The oracle message might seem a little short, but I have found them so far to be very on-point for the questions I’ve asked. And I especially enjoy reading the background stories about all the dark, deep, and dangerous entities and the way Demarco relates them to modern life.

The cards are all numbered at the top and also state whether they fall into the deep, dark, or dangerous category. And on the card, there is a keyword provided at the bottom. Right below the keyword is the name of the entity featured on the card. The guidebook has all the cards listed numerically, which makes it quite easy to look up the oracle message.

As for the imagery on the cards, the illustrations by Kinga Britschgi perfectly capture the essence of each entity. Britschgi has a knack for detail that really brings each entity to life. The interplay of colors and shading make for eye-catching imagery. Some cards provoke a bit of fear, while others invoke a sense of wonder and awe, such as Kraken, featured to the right. 

I enjoy how the visuals sometimes give me a little shiver and remind me of the power in connecting with these unconscious forces. I am reminded of the thrill of taking a walk on the wild side. Britschgi’s images invoke the heightened sense of arousal that comes from letting the imagination linger in the darkness and depths, bringing to life what we might find in the shadows.

The card I pulled for today was Selkie. It is a depth card and the keyword is freedom. The duality is containment/freedom and pretense/authenticity. The oracle message encourages me to seek out my inner truth and embrace my authenticity, as that is ultimately the route to freedom.

This feels resonant with me, as I just made my first social media post in a while that detailed my inner journey of personal and emotional growth. It was scary to put myself out there instead of hiding behind the filters and hashtags, but sharing my feelings did indeed feel liberating. I take heart in Demarco’s message of how the selkie can find their way back home after being lost in a realm not of their own. She writes:

“Eventually, the selkie finds her skin and is reunited with her authentic form. Without a backward glance, she steps into it, and allows herself to be enveloped by her true shape once again and re-enters the aquatic world.”2

I just love how the mythos of the selkie is drawn upon to find meaning in my present circumstance. The entities in this deck really make one reflect on their own circumstance, delving into the parts of ourselves we keep tucked away, both consciously and unconsciously. Taking the time to go deep, embrace the darkness, and acknowledge the danger puts us in the position to discover new aspects of ourselves while also embracing shifts happening that are meant to steer us clear of potential downfalls.

All in all, Deep, Dark & Dangerous Oracle has quickly become one of my favorite decks. The card and messages ask you to be bold in acknowledging these entities. A whole world of exploration is opened if you have the courage to go beyond the realm of comfort. Facing what scares us the most is a great way to empower ourselves and discover just what we’re capable of, and this deck is the perfect way to gently ease your way into the unknown. I highly encourage those seeking to add a bit of mystery and intensity to their readings to see what dark and dangerous things might be hiding in their depths. I bet you’ll be surprised just how cathartic, transformative, and filled with beauty it can be to find out!

The Enchanted Moon, by Stacey DeMarco

The Enchanted Moon: The Ultimate Book of Lunar Magic, by Stacey DeMarco
Rockpool Publishing, 9781925946147, 247 pages, November 2021

Moonstruck. Dance by the light of the moon. Lunacy. Tides. Prehistoric cave drawing. Ahh – the Moon! She has always been a guiding force. 

Stacey DeMarco’s book, The Enchanted Moon: The Ultimate Book of Lunar Magic, is chock-full of valuable information on developing a relationship with the Moon to assist with living our lives in a magical way. I avoided saying “working” with the Moon because the book is rife with ways for us to play with the Moon, dance under the Moon, grow with the Moon – you know, have fun with the Moon, while deepening our relationship with our inner goddess/god and La Bella Luna. As DeMarco explains, “this is the witches’ way – practical and magical.”1

I was so excited to get the book that I dove right in. Yet there was so much information and great suggestions, coupled with an abundance of invocations, rituals, and spells, that I soon realized I needed to honor DeMarco’s work by then slowing down and picking and choosing what sections to focus on for my own work. I began to use the various sections to do deep dives into actually working with the power of the Moon

DeMarco begins by writing about the Moon scientifically: its gravitational force, tides, and even the light of the Moon and how it’s been used from the beginning of time. She then flows into the lunar rhythms and cycles, describing waxing and waning moons, new and full moons, eclipses, and blue moons – and the influences of each phase. As I write this, the Moon is in a waxing phase – a good time to set intentions for growth and for prosperity spells.

In the “Inner Cycles” chapter, I found it interesting to read that “the moon phase upon (one’s) birth triggered the beginning of life and remained as a person’s peak time energetically throughout life.”2 I began to pay attention to when the Moon’s phase was returning to where it was on the day of my birth and used this knowledge as guidance. It’s easy to look up the phase for your birthday, if you’re interested in doing the same.

DeMarco then delves into how one can start to practice lunar magic. She writes about three vital skills that are needed, noting:

“This is how I begin with my students who are serious about working with earth elements and lunar energies, and for all of them, you need nothing but yourself… YOU are the weaver of magic and magic starts with you. That is more than enough.”3

How empowering! The first skill is Observation – noticing the moon for a lunar cycle, observing the light, the star and planets, the moon’s surface.

The second skill is Sitting Out – Utiseta. “The practice of purposeful ‘sitting out,’ called utiseta was a meditative and somewhat shamanic activity.”4 She recommends as a start that one sits or lays in one’s garden (if you have one) for at least three hours for each lunar cycle, connecting with the earth and the moon.

The third skill is Casting Circles.  “In lunar magic, it is a reflection of the shape of that big moon above you and is a way to capture the energy.”5 The book delves into lunar rituals for both solo work and working with a group. 

For the 28 moons of the month, each magical in its own way, she offers “profiles of the energy, as well as a spell, ritual, and invocation or meditation…for the feel of the phase’s opportunity.”6

For instance, I loved the ritual of grounding and protection done under a dark moon. It was powerful to feel rooted in the earth, receiving goddess-given power from the earth knowing that the power was unlimited and protective. Admittedly, I felt more comfortable and less noticeable to my neighbors by doing my first ritual in the cover of darkness.

The next ritual I feel called to do is on the waxing crescent, with the intention of making our home a sanctuary for ourselves. I love working with my home at the beginning of the year, and will call on the friendly fires of Vesta, so this lunar work feels very aligned right now.

The book also details gardening “more successfully and magically”7 using the moon cycle. She also explains plants that can be used in lunar magic and shares about the wisdom of each plant. Coincidentally (I say that tongue in cheek), I’ve been wanting to buy eucalyptus, and now read that Stacey recommends it for clarity and strength, which are much needed right now! 

As DeMarco writes, “Almost every culture has a lunar goddess or god.”8, so the book also explores deities such as Hekate and Artemis. She also details working with animals of the moon, such as the hare that is often seen in the waxing moon.

The book concludes with working with crystals and potions, herbs, and baths. “The Never-Ending Learning” chapter offers resources such as DeMarco’s website and that of NASA. What I found to be a really amazing gift was that DeMarco included universal dark, new, and full moon charts for the next 15 years: 2022 – 2036. This is an amazing resource!

DeMarco is a sharer of her knowledge of lunar magic. Her work is remarkable; I use her Moon Magick: Deep Moon Messages mini-cards daily for a quick pull. I highly recommend her work, but especially The Enchanted Moon. It’s a resource, it’s a starter, it’s a guide – it’s all good things in relation to lunar magic rolled into one!

Plants of Power, by Stacey Demarco and Miranda Mueller

Plants of Power: Cultivate Your Garden Apothecary and Transform Your Life, by Stacey Demarco and Miranda Mueller
Rockpool Publishing, 1925924351, 352 pages, September 2021

“Go touch grass.” This is a sentiment that I really took to heart this past spring, summer, growing season or whatever else you want to call it. I ended up going ham in my little yard and definitely bit off more than I could chew this season. Clearing out the unwanted and planning for what I did want around me was rough and it’s still a work in progress. 

It’s through this little foray into the growing stuff side of life that made this book ping my interest radar. So, I waddled over to my shelf just to see what I had over there. Whelp, I will admit I had no books on plants. None, zip, zilch.

I want a practical plant space. I want it full of good strong allies ready and willing to help me out when I need it in exchange for the love and care I have to give. And with a hesitant chuckle, I began to read Plants of Power: Cultivate Your Garden Apothecary and Transform Your Life by Stacey Demarco and Miranda Mueller. This book is a good book, a great book even, and it has definitely taught me a thing or two.

I was aware that our ancestors, those who walked before us, had a deep connection to the land. It fed them, gave them the raw materials needed to build tools and shelter, the power to mend wounds and ease illness, all things we have lost touch with today. They found the plants that lessened swelling and eased a headache by observing what we nowadays can glean from a quick google search provided by science and electricity. This was their science; our science is much different. Don’t get me wrong, science is great, but it is also not so great. 

“Talk of how a plant might alter consciousness has increased the chance of that plant being banned by authorities, usually with a campaign of fear.”1

It’s the sad truth. We are so disconnected from the land and how to use it that we fear what should not be feared, we demonize what should be respected and we cherry pick which plants get this treatment. We do not shun the Lily just because it’s lethal to cats. We ignore the fact that the bulb of the Daffodil is bad for both us and our canine companions as we edge walkways with them. There are so many wonderful plant allies that have been done dirty just because we do not understand them the way we once did. I better cut this off here though and move onto the book proper here.

Part One

This book, past the intro, is divided into two main sections. The first part consists of six bite sized charters that covers a little about our authors and some general plant knowledge.

The first chapter is the meet-the-author chapter. Here we get an abridged version of their life paths away and back to the land. The next two cover nature and the land. The patterns that appear in nature have lessons to teach us if only we would slow down and listen, tending the land that we have is a great way to do this by the by. Be this land a full yard or a few pots on a balcony, it’ll do you some good me thinks.

The second half of the chapters are less about the land itself and more about the plants and what we can do for/with them. Did you know that plants can sense your intent? What about the fact that there’s two, two different ways to compost? What about using the moon and zodiac signs in your planting and harvesting? I sure as heck didn’t. I’d recommend paying extra attention to these sections, as they were quite eye opening for me and I’m sure they will also be for you.

Part Two

Here we get into the greenery proper. The plants are split into sections based on season and each plant gets a few pages to itself. These pages are laid out as follows. First, the common name at the top and the scientific one directly underneath it. Then, under that a box is further quick info like other names, planetary rulings, and a little correspondence list. Past the box is a quick blurb on the plant, some notes on its cultivation and foraging.

The really fun part of this section, the crafts section. In the crafts section, we get a bit of a mix bag from recipes for food like mint pesto and even mouthwash to meditations and salves centered on our plant in question.

Y’all my wallet gonna hate me this coming spring! I’m kidding…maybe… But in all seriousness coming out of the reading gauntlet (I tore through this book in three days) I have a deeper appreciation for the earth and the plants that I already have been tending. Which are a few mints, some common sage bushes, rosemary and a marshmallow, in case you were curious. My wishlist of plants has also become obscenely long, but it will be thinned out as I research further on which ones will grow best in my area. I hope to add at least two plants from this book as well as many, many more mint plants in pots so I can make all the mint pesto I want (recipe page 180).

Miscellaneous

I did have some minor issues with this book. Don’t you go scrunching your face up at these words, remember it’s physically impossible to fully please everyone with what you create and you just gotta roll with it. The biggest, most glaring issue is where is the index?! There’s usually an index in books like this. I don’t normally need to use the index, but in looking for the page with that mint pesto recipe, the index was sorely missed. I mean I eventually found it, but it would have been so much faster and less frustrating had there been an index.

These next two wishes were not mine originally. My wonderfully accepting and former chef father pointed out that some of the plants with an edible craft do not have a basic flavor profile. While this particular nit-pick isn’t a big one, it’s still something that might have been nice. The last one is phonetic spelling on some of the names. We spent a good twenty minutes debating the pronunciation of Comfrey over coffee one afternoon. While it was invigorating to whip out my phone and prove myself correct, this particular inclusion would have made the discussion unnecessary.

Overall Plants of Power is a great book, well worth the coin for this particular ware. This book would be a good fit for someone who doesn’t have much knowledge about plants and their real uses beyond being a pretty thing outdoors. As a beginner in the plant world there is so much more to learn but that’s what research is for and this book is a great place to start from.

The basic info provided is enough to get an idea of what you might want to start growing. This would help to keep the budding gardener from becoming overwhelmed by the sheer volume of things out there to learn. Why spend hours learning all the ins and outs of growing say an olive tree if you know for a fact you don’t have the space or proper growing conditions for one?

I would also think someone with an intermediate to advanced knowledge of plants would also find value in Plants of Power. Even if they don’t exactly learn anything “new”, the different perspectives these two authors bring to the table ought to open doors to revelations and breakthroughs that might otherwise have laid dormant. 

Moon Magick, by Stacey Demarco

Moon Magick: Deep Moon Messages, by Stacey Demarco, designed by Sara Lindberg
Rockpool Publishing, 9781925946154, 40 cards, April 2021

Moon Magick: Deep Moon Messages by Stacey Demarco is a charming deck of affirmation cards to help one connect with the cycles of the Moon. Stacey has a strong background in paganism and moonology and has published other items such as Queen of the Moon Oracle and the annual Lunar and Seasonal Diary.

The tiny deck is pocket-sized and avails itself to pulling a card a day. As Stacey recommends, “Pull a single card each morning; it is a simple act that will help guide your day with a solitary insight. Hold the affirmation to your heart and integrate it for the day.” 1  There are 40 cards in total, each measuring 2 inches by 4 inches. Each card contains an image on one side and a one-line affirmation on the other. 

“Our ancient ancestors often relied on divination to gain insight. We, too, as modern people can also benefit from receiving regular messages from the energies.”2

The illustrative side of each card is connected to either a Moon god or goddess or a phase of the Moon. Gods and goddesses represented include Dionysus, Diana, Artemus, Tu’er Ye, Hina, Hekate, Mani, and Baiame. The illustration for Tu’er Ye, or the Rabbit on the Moon, depicts a white rabbit standing on its haunches positioned against a full moon with varying shades of blue against a star-filled sky. The accompanying affirmation is “I choose to take a higher perspective and widen my views.”

The remaining cards focus on the phases of the moon: dark, waxing and waning crescent, first and last quarters, waxing and waning gibbous, full, super moon, blue moon, micro moon, and eclipse. I was most drawn to these images that just depicted the Moon, as some illustrations included images of people or animals.

The New Moon card was illustrated with a tiny sliver of a pinkish moon against a navy sky, with white clouds below and a few stars in the sky. “I accept renewal and delight in fresh starts”3 was the accompanying affirmation. 

The waning gibbous card depicts a woman sitting cross-legged on a rocky ledge, palms resting upward on her knees, as she stares at the yellow rising sun, large white moon above. “I seek balance and grounding”4 is the affirmation.

While I recognize that the deck is an affirmation deck, I think a small accompanying booklet describing the phases of the moon and the gods and goddess would have deepened the meaning of the affirmations for me. It’s nice to read the affirmations, but I don’t know enough about the deities or moon phases to make a personal connection, and going off the affirmations I don’t really get a full message from the cards, just an affirmation with no explanation of how its related to the card’s imagery. If you want a deeper dive into the Moon I recommend Demarco’s items previously mentioned.

However, I would recommend using Moon Magick to connect to the wisdom of the Moon and for its use to start your day, as long as you are looking for a bit of inspiration. The card can be quite calming to one’s mind and soul. For instance, to begin my day today, I pulled the waning crescent card that affirmed “I am loved beyond measure.” Priceless! I enjoyed this affirmation very much and have carried the sentiment with me through the day.